Starting a New Job in a Global Crises

I recently started a new job. On my first day, the shutdown in Germany was widely happening. Now I'm concerned about my situation. But should I really?

These are tough times. And there are tougher times ahead. Most likely. Heck, I don't know. And clearly, nobody else does.

COVID-19 has a good grip on our society, health system, and economies. I won't go into detail on how our society needs to deal with it, and how essential our behavior in these times is. I can't even speak to these things. 

No, I want to talk about feelings—mine in particular. After six months of not working at all (which is a story for another time), I got a new gig at a HubSpot Partner agency. I'm still very hyped about it, but I also joined the team during one of the biggest global crises.

Am I in the Hot Seat?

Although I'm very privileged with the overall working laws in Germany, I'm worried. It's common to have a six month probation period where both parties can cancel the contract very quickly and with short notice.

That in itself isn't a bad thing. I think it's essential for both parties to give the engagement a test drive. Under normal circumstances, at least.

As with many companies, if money is short and contracts are rare in the upcoming month, we can expect the latest hires will be the first ones to go. I fear I will be the first one to go. We see these effects already.

It's hard to express how I feel these days. Seeing closed restaurants, the distance between people in lines, and rising numbers in the news is crazy.

I'm not scared about the virus itself or that I could be affected. I'm worried about infecting others and, like many, take the necessary actions. But for the first time in my life, I'm concerned about the economy.

I bet there are a lot of people like me who feel a mix of a scare, worry, and anxiety. And yes, I and a lot of others can work from home at a computer, which is fantastic.

But it's hard to do business as usual because it ain't business as usual.

But let's look at the bigger picture

As I said, I'm in Germany with a very high standard in working laws were other measures like short-term work could be taken into account before firing people.

I'm not working in one of the most affected industries, either. I'm not running a hotel, event venue, or restaurant. So I can check that box as well.

However, my greatest luck is that I started in an Inbound agency. And inbound is all about building relationships and earn trust. No one in the inbound ecosystem is in there for a quick turn around. They're there for the long term and a sustainable impact. 

It's one of the healthiest ways to think about business, marketing, and selling for all people involved, including employees. 

How to feel in crises

I'm still kinda worried. And I think it's important not to ignore your feelings. My point is perspective. We need to set things into perspective and rethink our relationship with emotions. 

Although it might be annoying to work from home and overwhelming starting a new job, I'm privileged in most ways. So I should be fine. And if not, I will also be fine. I have friends and family that would support me no matter what. And if I lose my job, I will find something else. Maybe not within my dream field, but I will find something.

There are far less lucky lines of work, industries, and people that are challenged daily. And I'm sure we all can help another somehow. How? I have no fucking clue yet. This is what we need to figure out together. But thinking about your feelings and situation is a start.

Chriso Klepke

Besides thinking talking about himself in third person is weird, he fancies responsible growth strategies and product design.